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prohibiting the use of coffee and coca-cola -- cola in the world. this is a little over an hour as they discuss the invitation of its use worldwide. >> could please turn on that. thank you. we are going to be talking about coffee, and cola and the ingredients in cola. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths through much profit and how they make their way into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to t
postevent features. and to get us started i want to reduce the mastermind of today's event, bernard curtis. burnet is, i learned today, one of four curators of photography in the prints and photographs division. i'm sure they are all here. it is my pleasure to turn it over to berna curtis. let's give her a and. -- in a hand. [applause] >> thank you very much, john. i have to say that we are all in this together. i'm not the mastermind. today, we have brigitte freed was the winner of the photographer whose work is featured in the book, "this is the day: the march on washington," which we are celebrating. and we have the distinguished dr. michael eric dyson, and we have paul farber. all of them here with us for a special kind of conversation, which is how we build this. i will tell you a little bit about each individual quickly. because time is of the essence. and i'd like to tell you that brigitte freed was formally brigitte pflueger, and she met leonard freed in rome in 1956. they married a year later in amsterdam where they lived, deciding to leave for life in the united states in 1963,
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
people really do talk about -- they use that kind of exercise language that i use in the book, you know, you need mental calisthenics as well as physical ones to kind of keep your mind healthy, and that apparently can be helpful in dealing with alzheimer's and things like that, so there may well be a prescription of video games we may want to dole out to senior citizens. ok. good. all right. >> called everything bad is good for you, agree, disagree, the book is there for you to read and debate. and we ..ncoming out. [applause] >> are you going to stay around? >> stick around, we are going to sign. >> is that where i >> next on the tv, trevor aaronson says since 9/11 the fbi has built up a network of over 15,000 informant and muslim communities around the u.s. he argues these informants spearhead phony terror plots which are then exposed by the fbi with great fanfare to make it look like the was doing a good job of keeping us safe. mr. aaronson is joined by coadjutor mother jones magazine. this is in our 15. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out. trevor and i spend a lot of time
about operas, books, and publishing by letting us on facebook at facebook.com/booktv or folacin twitter. up next, samuel graveyard use of our elected leaders of find the courage to reform the economy and government spending soon the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries to. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for your introduction. it's a great privilege to be here. inviting the it council, in many cases the of many people here and heritage for very long time. and also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which, i think, is the attention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people of beliefs, ideas, habits, expectations, and the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. >> on this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy, the heart of my book, becoming europe. because the -- becoming europe is certainly about what has happened to your and why it is now regarded as the sick man
to move along to get to all the features and get us started what i want to introduce the mastermind of today's event, i've learned today one of four curators of photography and i am sure they're all here. it is my pleasure to turn the program over to verna curtis. [applause] >> thank you very much, we're all in this together. i am not the mastermind. we have brigitte freed the widow of the photographer of the book "this is the day" the march on washington" which we are celebrating. the also have michael eric dyson and paul farber here with us for a special kind of conversation. i will tell you about each individual quickly because time is of the essence and i would like to tell you brigitte freed said she met leonard freed 1956 in rome and lived and varied in amsterdam when they left for the united states in 1963 a few months before that would be the march on washington. i don't think they knew that was about to happen. she printed leonard's photographs over 20 years including those in the book black and white america and made in germany and the internationally acclaimed exhibitions
china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asymmetry. and you find i
us at twitter.com/booktv. >> you're watching booktv. next, jeffrey engel talks about his book, "into the desert," a collection of essays by journalists, government officials, and scholars that look back on the events in the impact of the 1990-91 gulf war. it's about an hour 20 your. >> doctor jeffrey engel is the founding director of the presidential history project at southern methodist university, until the summer of 2012, he served as the class of 52 a.m., professor at texas a&m university in the bush school. so we are pleased there here as well. that you very much for the support you've given to jeffrey engel and to the bush school in texas and them. when jeff was in texas a&m county was the dreck of programming for the institute and is a graduate of cornell university. additionally, studied at saint catherine's college, oxford university, and received his ph.d in american history from university of wisconsin at madison. he served as an postdoctoral fellow in international security studies at yale university. his books include "cold war at 30,000 feet,." he received a pretty sign
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
quite cranky with us for saying it but how about that? you can't say anything about iraq. he never saw iraq. it happened 30 years after he was gone. >> now i would like to add with what you began the book with which is in this most recent election in iran that when there was considerable consternation about how the election went, the state aired the lord of the rings in an effort to pacify people but he didn't have that effect. what happened to? >> the tremendous irony is that while the state, the ahmadinejad regime says they don't get many western movies. these movies are hotter than the sun and everybody is watching them. of course years after they came out of the west, they came out in early 2000 it was 2009, here is the irony. the seikh pokes the movies out there that they should have had some of their own people watch them very carefully. what the movies do, when the movies are about ursula freedom they argue in favor of democracy and on as practices and fair treatment as in a combination of injustice, they would hardly be something you would show people to try to calm them down.
.. there were no towns, and i could see us just sitting their like we had forever so we started playing out camps to build rangers. so you have to understand the context of my level of where we were triet after two tours of vietnam combat a was to be a soldier because we had done all these things in vietnam and the only thing we knew is when we went to the gulf war we were so good and the reagan dollars and what happened to america's military i remember being asked after the war by several think-tank groups that came in to talk about me. did you worry about where the enemy was? i didn't care. i just want to know what they were because it would be any that we ran into. it's been lost of where we were and what was going on at the different levels and never seeing any of these briefings. never seeing any of these briefings september, october, november. we didn't really know we were going to attack iraq sometime in december. we were defending saudi arabia and wasn't until sometime in december that we started working at shortstop's level they were on to offensive war planning but not
. and this morning he's going to talk to us about his latest, "invisible armies." with that, turn it over to you, max. [applause] >> thank you very much, steve, for that warm and generous introduction, and thank you also for your many years of service, and i see a lot of folks who are either current and active duty or retired military, and i thank all of you for your years of service to the nation. what i'm here to talk about today is the contents of my new book, which as steve mentioned, is a history of ger guerrilla warfare. and although it may seem thick and daunting at first glance, i did try to tell a good story. it sort of encapsulated 5,000 years of guerrilla warfare history into one book. now, that may seem like a formidable undertaking, but here today in front of your very eyes, i'm going to do something that is even harder; i'm going to try to encapsulate the entire book into about a 25-minute talk. [laughter] so that's going to work out to about 200 years per minute. sofassen your -- sofassen your seat belts, we're going to go on a historical journey here. i'm going to talk about the origi
afternoon. welcome to the heritage foundation and to our auditorium. please welcome those are joining us on all of these occasions honor heritage.org website, for those inside -- in the house. please make sure cell phones are turned off. we will post the program within 24 hours honor heritage home page for your further reference as well. hosting where the debate is doctor bucci, director of our center for foreign policy studies. he previously served heritage a senior research fellow for defense and homeland security. is well-versed in the special area operations and cybersecurity areas as well as defense support to civil authorities. he served for three decades as an army special forces officer in july 2001 coming assume the duties of military assistance to secretary rumsfeld and worked daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years, and then upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon is deputy assistant secretary of defense, homeland defense, and america security affairs but please join me in welcoming steve bucci. [applause] >> let me add my welcome to all of
we have to take responsibility for educating ourselves in our own communities using the means we have of at our disposal. thank you. >> thank you. [applause] >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us @booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> max boot presents a history of guerrilla warfare. the author poz its that unconventional warfare, often thought of as a modern means of war, has a long tradition that dates back to antiquity. this is a little under an hour. >> everybody got quiet. good afternoon. welcome to the heritage foundation and to our louis lehrman auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who are joining us on our heritage.org web site. for those in-house as we prepare to begin, please, make sure cell phones have been turned off. it is our courtesy our speakers do appreciate. we will post the program within 24 hours on our heritage home page for your further reference as well. hosting our event today is steven bucci. dr. bucci is director of our dougallyson cent
you think of our programming this weekend. you can tweak us on booktv, comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail, booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> now on c-span2 we bring you booktv, 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books. here are some programs to look out for this weekend. at 5:00 p.m. eastern, ben shapiro argues liberals believe their competition discouraging political debate. at 2:00 a.m. michele alexander opines that policies from the 70s for and acted to push back gains made during the civil-rights movement. on sunday with recent policy debates on immigration we bring you stories from immigrants who share their experiences on booktv at 4:00 p.m. eastern. at 11:00 p.m. sunday melvin goodman argues the government is spending excessively on defense making us less secure. watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for complete schedule visit booktv.org. up next on booktv cita stelzer talks about the dinner hosted by winston churchill during and after world war ii which were used to persuade world leaders to adopt his position on variou
. but at the same time there is a civilian who used to teach history at west point is written in study after getting the courage at the enterprise institute. they would get the study into the white house directly to president bush, to the pentagon to the secretary of defense to some of the support and it's an eyebrow so that basically by the time petraeus becomes the top commander, everything is all lined up. it's lined up so that he can go in and impose the strategy that he wants to impose in the united states government this isn't a coincidence. it's been very exquisitely coordinated. >> you can watch this and other programs online at book tv. >> up next on book tv, samuel argues if our elected leaders do not find the courage to reform the economy and government spending soon, the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries do today. this is just over an hour. >> coming to speak at the heritage foundation today it is a great privilege to be here. i've always been a great admirer of heritage and the council in many cases the friendship of many people at
with steel. that's a carnegie kids. we used cars powered that will, it will rockefeller built them is the financial system and consuming is built on a system developed and created by people at pulitzer. pulitzer came to the united states and unearthing the soldiers and they went to europe and he didn't really see any action. like many veterans after the war he was on foot, often afterwards hard to integrate people into the economy. he ends up in st. louis greek becomes befriended by a major who becomes a senator from missouri this newspaper publisher. pulitzer enters the road. within five years of his dreamy night state companies elected state legislature to stare. it's that kind of speed of immigration 19th century when people would come in. to become successful in a really short in the story, in st. louis, inventing a new form of journalism. pulitzer is the modern-day surfer. if you go to a beach and look at on the water cannot be on with the waves are breaking the cnn in winning paddling was there for us, one of them paddles extraordinary speed and because they perceive the undu
just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, personal friend of bill's, like everyone in this room is. and so when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about to lessons of debt crises and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot, what we needed to the will to do. so we were able to convince them. so no i'm not talking to you about this -- talking to you as his friend but his publisher. we had this decision. we were going to do this book, and we did. the ink was that even dry when henry kissinger came out and said, this is a must-read for anybody in any section at any level of the finance industry. no sooner did he do that than paul volcker came out and what to make a comment about how this is a must read. it is a must rea
which were used to persuade world leaders to adopt his position on various matters. it's about 40 minutes. >> good evening. thank you all for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book, "dinner with churchill: policy making at the dinner table." since my book is all about the importance of dinners, be assured that i will not make you late for your own dippers. -- dinners. i will be brief, i just want to whet your appetite so that you'll buy my book. do you want to -- let's try another sentence. i have lived with winston churchill for four years, and it was wonderful. even though that took place in the frigid archives after churchill college. i'm often asked where i got the idea for still another book on churchill to add to the thousands already written. well, i've read many books about this fascinating man and notice that many of his important accomplishments were achieved at dinners, sometimes at lunches. so i began to wonder why that was so, why most of the deals that were struck at the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made at o
churchill used to persuade world leaders to don't his position on various matters. it's about forty minutes. [inaudible conversations] good evening. thank you for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book "dinner with churchill: policy-making at the dinner table." since my book is all about the importance and dinners be assuredly not make you late for your own dinners. i will be brief. i want to whet your appetite so you'll buy my book. you want to -- i have lived with wrurnlg winston churchill for four years. it was wonderful. even though it took place in churchill college. i'm asked where i got the idea to add to the thousand already written. i have read many books about the man and notice many of the important accomplishments were achieved at dinners. sometimes at luncheons. so i began to wonder why that was so. why most of the deals that were struck at the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made at or facilitated by dinners at which the leaders were more relaxed in a formal session. so i began digging in to the churchill archives. not do
prize winner passed away. that reflects the power of that price, a century still honoring people using pulitzer same. it does something that shares of the nobel peace prize. if you look carefully, nobel peace prizes given to people in danger, for democracy trying to bring about peace and dangerous place like northern ireland. the reason the price is given because you're not going to go and fascinate somebody who just won the nobel peace prize. it's bringing world attention. the most significant pulitzer prize is the one for public service been given to newspapers daringly covering something the community didn't want them to cover. the journalists are ostracized, the local towns often pull out their advertisements and the newspaper's right about some lame it could be a scandal, but the community doesn't want to hear about it. when i got the pulitzer prize, it's a recognition, national recognition and in a sense provides the same umbrella of protection to people who are daring. >> postservice and extraordinarily significant person who still to this day affects our lives. jessica child ma
described with great exuberance the naval battle using wine glasses and decanters to show the position of the ships and blowing smoke from his cigar to imitate the cannon fire. it would have been wonderful to have been there. the topic at churchill's table were wide-ranging, and cold, exploding harbors, movies, that hamilton woman was a great favorite of churchill's, and politics. his curiosity was boundless. many of his guests wrote to friends or recorded in their diaries his conversations, repeated his anecdotes and commented on the foodie served. in addition i found hundreds of bills for dinner she gave at hundred hotels, the ritz, guest lists, amended wine lists, many letters from churchill complaining about overbilling, banking his friends for gifts of food and wine, ringing generous tips for hotel waiters call in the archives, all set out in my book. i have produced many of the menus in my book in case any of you want to try to duplicate one or two of them at a special party at home. the wine list might be harder for you to replicate since so many decades have passed since church
by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when henry kissinger came out and sai
billion u.s., ten trillion yen, 2.2% of gdp. a lot of that would go to infrastructure, a lot to the north to the earthquake area, but, of course, we've seen 14 such packages since the late 1990s. and this one has to be different. and also he's pressing the bank of japan. last time i was here was to introduce governor shirakawa several years ago who i think is a very good governor of one of the major central banks in the world, pressing him to put in more monetary stimulus which i think is necessary. but i, one of the points that was made right in this room several years ago by governor shirakawa, and i've been with him three times in the last two months, is, you know, monetary and fiscal stimulus aren't enough n. the case of japan, you need major deregulation. i think major structural reforms, deregulation in the service area. so, hopefully, that'll all flow into the package of the new prime minister. certainly, a tough job -- it's a tough job, but this is the world's third largest economy, and if we don't get japan moving with some of the other problems with europe, etc., i think the wor
you so much, patrick james are with us. again the book is "the international relations of middle-earth: learning from the lord of the rings" this has been the scholar circle. i am maria armoudian and we will see you next week. >> guest: thank you so much. >> and her work, "pat nixon," mary brennan recounts the life. mrs. nixon's recent release private documents. this is just over 15 minutes. >> welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul paul wormser anm acting director of the library. i appreciate all of you, into one american canoeing author top presentations. today we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon who was born 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, who did much of the research here for her book, is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas and san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement then she has written to date three different books. that's been turning right at the 16th, capture of the gop, wives and mothers and the conservative fundament crusade against
used to work for me in the white house, and so as a lawyer, and i'm glad he and his family settled here in savannah. thank you to the trinity united methodist church for the beautiful venue, and the books, ladies and gentlemen, independent local bookstores are part of the bedrock of our whole civilization so let's support them. [cheers and applause] so i want to tell you about that book, "the future: six drivers of global change." i've always been fascinated with those who try to look over the horizon and see what's coming at us, and back when i was a young congressman, i had the privilege of chairing a group called the congressional clearinghouse on the future, and it was started by a north carolina congressman, charlie rose, the other charlie rose we say now. [laughter] charlie has passed on, but he was a great man, and he asked me to chair it in my second term in the congress, and i had a chance to invite to the congress, oh, gosh, al and john and buck and margaret and carl, and first one, and then the other, hundreds of them, and it was a wonderful experience. in in case, i learned
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)